Senator Emmanuel Pacquiao has a big problem.

While he was training for his boxing bout with Errol Spence, Jr., the PDP-Laban national assembly removed him as acting president and put his arch-nemesis Alfonso Cusi in his stead. It was a knock-out punch that his own party-mates delivered as rebuke for his arrogance. All of a sudden, he became just an ordinary member of PDP-Laban.

His problems didn’t end there.

Only yesterday, a survey on the approval and trust ratings for incumbent Senators showed that Pacquiao suffered a significant decline in the numbers. Publicus Asia reported that Pacquiao’s disapproval rating jumped by 23%, from 12% in the first quarter to 35% in the second quarter.

Pacquiao’s approval rating consequently fell — from 66% in the first quarter to 37%. It’s a 29% drop that can only indicate that his actions during the last three months earned him disfavor from more Filipinos.

His trust rating also plummeted from 53% to 25%.

In my opinion, this precipitous drop in his approval and trust ratings are the result of his declaration to run for President. It does not take in account his “expose” on alleged corruption last July 3 before leaving for the U.S. that was quickly demolished as a fraud. Neither did it consider the “punch drunk” description of him by the President two weeks ago. The survey covered only the months of April to June.

I’m certain the falling numbers are influenced heavily by public perception that Pacquiao has disrespected the President over his remarks about the West Philippine Sea issue and attacks on Cusi. The slide will likely continue in the third quarter over his “corruption has tripled” accusations in July and a growing public anger over his abandonment of his Senate duties to fight with Errol Spence.

This could signal the downfall of Pacquiao unless he is able to return to his senses and apologize to the President and the Filipino people.